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Learn to play Guitar (Easy)

October 6, 2013

Acoustic guitar, yeah, I know, its beautiful when someone plays it in front of you, and secretly inside, I know you’re having a lust for playing it. You just want to grab that beautiful piece of carved wood and strings from his hands and …. Well that’s it isn’t it. You don’t know how to play it.

 

Its not that difficult truly. Its really easy, just needs practice and a bit of a technique. Well I’ll be honest, you will have to practice yourself, I’m basically helping you out with the technique only. Practice it as much as you can. Just don’t piss your neighbours off. Okay lets start.

 

Parts of a guitar

We need to know about the parts of the guitar before starting to actually play it as this is really important. Here’s a picture for a quick glance.

 

                                 

 

We are basically concerned with the fret board. Other parts never lose their significance but the fret board is the most important part of the guitar.

 

String names

For your ease, the thinnest string at the bottom of the guitar is known as the 1st string. Then right up next to it is the 2nd string. And similarly all the way up to the thickest string, known as the 6th string.

 

The strings can also be represented by alphabetic names which are:

 

1st string =   High e

2nd string =  B

3rd string =  G

4th string =   D

5th string =   A

6th string =   low E

 

                          

 

 

The fret board

Now the basic theory behind playing a guitar is the combination of finger placements/press on different strings on different frets known as chords. Once you press these combinations on the fret board, you have to strum the strings at the position of the sound hole, using a pick or otherwise. The frets are numerically named as follows:

 

 

 

 

Chords

The combinations of the strings and frets earlier mentioned, known as chords are the basic technique for playing the acoustic guitar. The chords are also alphabetically named.

 

There are 2 types of each chord. A minor and a Major. And there are 2 ways to play a chord, the relatively easy open way or by barring a whole fret. But we’ll get to that later.

 

The simplest beginner chord is the E minor chord.

The chord composition is such that you place your middle finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret and your ring finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret. A chord diagram will help you here.

 

                                         

 

 

Now let us analyse the E major chord. Just add the index finger in the above arrangement on the 3rd string, 1st fret. 

 

                                          

 

Now press down these two chords and start strumming four times for each chords. But before you do this, a very important tip is that when you press down the strings with your fingers, be sure to only touch those strings which are required for the particular chord. Touching any other string will not help you in playing the chord, instead  the guitar will sound a discontinued chord. 

 

Strumming

Picking all the strings in one flow from the 6th string to the 1st is known as strumming. The strumming patterns played by experienced and professional guitarists are slightly tricky, but nontheless achievable. To start off, i would suggest you strum down four times on the chord you are playing, then switch to another chord and strum it down four times. It is the speedy and swift transition of the chords that makes you a good guitarist. 

 

Once you start playing all the chords fluently and swiftly and once you learn different strumming patterns you will be ready to play songs on the guitar.

 

So have fun practicing, don’t let it get inside your head, keep it moderate, remember, you can never become an experienced guitarist overnight, but don’t give up. It takes some time, but your practice will always help. 

 

Queries are welcomed.

 

here are some open chords to go:

 

                             

 

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